How to Use the New Task Manager in Windows 8 or 10 – (from HowtoGeek.com)

If you have been a windows user for any length of time then you probably seen the the task manager before and may be used it to kill a rouge program. For Windows 8 and Windows 10, task manager has been revamped into a feature rich resource and process monitor alongside its task killing abilities.

Howtogeek.com, one of my personal favorite sites for focused tutorials on common and not so common technical tasks, has an excellent breakdown of the new taskmanager. This article is especially useful for students enrolled in CompTIA A+, and MCTS 70-680 courses as at some point you will be encountering machines with newer windows operating systems and knowing what you can do with the tools available to you in the OS. task manager really has a lot of information on what a machine is doing in real time so it can be a powerful tool in diagnosing issues with a machine, especially performance issues with a system.

 

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IT Ninja Tip: hit CTRL+SHIFT+ESC to bring up taskmanager from the desktop in
Windows.  You can also hit CTRL+ATL+DELETE and then select task manager from the menu, but CTRL+SHIFT+ESC is more direct if you need.
from How-To Geek: How to Use the New Task Manager in Windows 8 or 10

 

ninja image from Andrés Álvarez Iglesias- via Flicker

A Must read Article on one of the Driving forces in the exponential rise in security threats.

A must read article from the UK edition of Ars Technica, a popular technology blog and one of my personal sources for solid tech writing,  (written by ) explores on one of the Driving forces in the exponential rise in security threats in recent years, the development of the zero day marketplace.  I highly recommend everyone read this to get an idea of the scope of the issues when it comes to security in the current technological climate.

 

How do you defend yourself against the unknown? That is crux of the zero-day vulnerability: a software vulnerability that, by definition, is unknown by the user of the software and often its developer as well.
The rise of the zero-day market – arstechnica.co.uk/